Tuesday, January 25, 2022

More on "Vineyard shouting with the bee whom hump"

Continuing on from "Vineyard shouting with the bee whom hump" . . .

I was thinking about the words in that title and how to fit them together in a somewhat logical way -- and, pretty obviously, one reason you might shout while working in a vineyard is if you were stung by a bee. As anyone who has been taught this stupid mnemonic to remember the Esperanto words for "bee" and "honey" can tell you,

When the bee stings me, abelo ("I bellow"),
And then the bee drops honey on me
And makes mielo ("me yellow")

This is a gin-u-wine Esperanto mnemonic from my Usona Esperantista Junularo days, and if a mnemonic's purpose is to be memorable, I guess it's an extremely effective one. Now that you've read this post, you'll always be able to promote world peace by discussing apiculture in George Soros's native tongue. I learned lots of other stupid mnemonics ("If he weds, he's an edz" is the only other one that comes to mind), but this particular one has sort of haunted me, even turning up in a dream decades later as a sort of plainsong-style chant.

Okay, so you're working in a vineyard, a bee stings you, and you bellow -- but where does "hump" fit it? Well, the "humps" in the Black Eyed Peas song refers to T&A (this is helpfully spelled out in the lyrics for those who miss the subtle subtext), so perhaps one of those regions is where the bee stings. And that made me think of Kanye West's bit in a song that has appeared on this blog before, Jay-Z's 2009 track "Run This Town." (Sorry about this stuff, guys. The sync fairies ain't got no class.)

And up top, unh,
Two bee stings
And I'm beasting
Off the Riesling

The "two bee stings" are what the Black Eyed Peas called "lovely lady lumps." As for "beasting," a homophone of "bee sting," it kind of sounds like something that involves shouting. (When I'm beasting, abelo, and then some guy pours Riesling on me and makes mielo.) Riesling, being a variety of wine grape, brings us back to the vineyard.

I had a memorable dream about a bee back in January or February of 1991. (I remember that the dream occurred during a time when my family was in the habit of watching the news of TV, which was only true during Desert Storm.)

There was a red bee flying around in a city -- New York, I believe -- and I was sure that it was going to explode, causing catastrophic damage. It was going to be a two-dimensional explosion, though, the shock waves extending out from the bee in a circle rather than a sphere. I was running around the city in a panic saying, in an awkward sort of English entirely different from the way I really talk, "Mother, this bee is very dangerous to me." Why "mother" I don't know -- my mother was not present in the dream -- but it's interesting in connection with the "Vineyard shouting with the bee whom hump" sermon, which is about Mata ("mother").

I wrote all of the above back in November, shortly after my original "Vineyard shouting with the bee whom hump" post, but didn't think it was worth actually posting. That old 1991 dream about the red bee kept coming back to me, though. It led me to do a Web search for red bee, which turned up this:


Those three red lines again! Even though it's not the logo of either Red Bee Media or Ericsson. And what song did I quote in this post?


I also noticed the word "MENA" in the Red Bee screenshot above, which made me think of the "Evil Bee" video from Menomena.

1 comment:

Ra1119bee said...

William,

When we realize WHO/WHAT Entities actually writes the lyrics to many songs, especially Rap,
we begin to see the hidden agenda, and those lyrics (especially Rap) takes on a whole different meaning, indeed.

Rhyme, Metre and Repetition are Powerful because they all (especially Rhyme)
are memorable, much like a Lullaby.
The Druids knew this secret, so did Theodor Seuss Geisel aka Dr. Seuss


Research Tavistock and Theodor W. Adorno
Cui Bono?

White sands, red sun

Bruce Charlton recently posted on C. S. Lewis's Law of Undulation . For me, the undulation tends to be between thinking and synching. I ...